22 Foods to Eat on a Ketogenic Diet

How To Remove Preservatives From Fruits Naturally?

Nov 15, 2016 by CureJoy Editorial

Produce processors frequently spray fruits and vegetables with a fine film of approved wax, lacquer or resin coating. This improves their shell life by protecting them from dehydration and other hazards. It’s suggested to wash off these coatings under running cold water. Commercial produce rinses are available but they’re no more effective than rinsing in cold water.

In consultation with CureJoy expert James Dudley:

Preservatives is what fruits and vegetables selling companies use to make the same last longer and also to keep them from getting spoiled. In other words, preservatives do exactly what their name suggests.

READ MORE

22 Foods to Eat on a Ketogenic Diet

by Dr. Jockers

A ketogenic diet is a low-carb, moderate-protein and high-fat nutrition plan. This article addresses some of the best foods to eat on a ketogenic diet.

Following a ketogenic diet has been effectively shown to improve cardiovascular health, regulate the endocrine system, stabilize blood glucose levels, support weight loss, improve insulin sensitivity in people with type-2 diabetes and even treat neurological dysfunction (8, 9).

Additionally, a ketogenic diet can improve your energy, cognitive acceleration and overall daily performance. Most people feel their best when in a state of mild-ketosis. One of the big challenges, is that most people have been raised on higher carb comfort foods. So rather than focusing on what foods you will miss, shift your energy to all the great foods you can enjoy. Here are 22 foods to eat on a ketogenic diet that you will LOVE!

READ MORE

Getting Past Toxic Gossip

JON SPAYDE · MARCH 2013

Gossip can be compelling, juicy, almost irresistible. But it can also be hurtful. Here’s how to discern between friendly chatter and mean-spirited rumor mongering.

Expert Source: Frank T. McAndrew, PhD, professor of psychology, Knox College, Galesburg, Ill., and author of “Can Gossip Be Good?” (Scientific American, October/November 2008)

It can start up in any small group, prefaced with “Did you hear . . . ?” or “I shouldn’t tell you this, but . . . ” followed by some juicy tidbit about a coworker or friend. Hearing something secret about someone you know (and maybe adding a detail of your own) often brings up a moral quandary. Should you indulge, denounce, ignore or withdraw from the gossip?

READ MORE

2017-02-19T19:10:37+00:00